Navigating your kids’ questions around disasters can be as unpredictable as Queensland’s weather. We’re here to help support conversations around the importance of preparing for extreme weather and help include your kids in the process of preparing for, responding to and recovering from disaster at home and in the classroom.

Information for parents

Queenslanders are no strangers to severe weather. That’s why it’s important to talk to your kids early about the dangers of severe weather so they understand how to prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters. The first step to having an open discussion about disaster risk with your kids is to involve them in your usual preparedness activities such as:

  • Cleaning up the yard

  • Completing and checking your emergency plan

  • Shopping for emergency kit items

  • Packing your emergency kit and evacuation kit

  • Practicing your evacuation plan

  • Checking severe weather reports

  • Checking on your neighbours.

Helpful resources for your household

Information for teachers

Coen school students

Help your students understand natural disasters from a new perspective. The Get Ready Queensland team travels to schools across Queensland to take your students through what kind of disasters they could face and provides practical tips and resources on how they can play a part in their household’s preparedness. Email getready@qra.qld.gov.au to book a visit for your school!

Resources for children

Extreme weather and disasters like floods, storms, cyclones and bushfires can be very frightening for infants and young children given their limited understanding of the events happening around them.

The Queensland Centre for Perinatal and Infant Mental Health designed a series of online books and games to assist parents, carers and teachers help young children process their fears and emotions during and after a disaster event.

Take a look at the Birdie’s Tree books and resources today!

If you have recently experienced a disaster event and are worried about your child’s mental health, speak to your GP or local child and Youth Mental Health Service.